Cheshire
Land Trust

Coneflower Helper

Return to Home Page

Print Monitor Inspection Form

Print CLT Property List

Cheshire Land Trust
Properties & Conservation Restrictions

Since its organization in 1969 the Cheshire Land Trust has acquired by gift or easement 31 properties across Cheshire totaling 568 acres. Five of these properties have active farming operations comprising 283 acres. The Land Trust is proud take on the responsibility of preserving this farmland for generations to come.The public can take comfort in knowing that Ives Farm, CLT's largest farm acquisition (2006) and a cherished part of Cheshire's agricultural history and most recently the Leavenworth Tree Farm 2013) will be preserved.

 

CLT Property & Conservation Restriction List

 

ID Ref.

Property by Easement

Acreage

Donor's Intent / Property Profile

Location

Public Access

Acquisition

Donor

A

Mortensen Sanctuary

8.40

Nature Preserve along Quinnipiac River on property owned by the Quinnipiac Valley Audubon Society.

Cheshire St.

Yes

Oct-73

Esther Mortensen

B

Roaring Brook 14.70 acre easement expired 2003 PRINT MAP

Forested preserve is part of rugged 75 acre State & Town park. Ravine with cascading  brook and the state's 2nd highest waterfall.

Roaring Brook Rd.

Yes

Dec-78

Lawrence Copeland

C

Clark Blue Trail

1.00

Property abuts Quinnipiac (Blue) Trail on Prospect Ridge

Bethany Mountain Rd.

Yes

Feb-80

Edward & Jane Clark

D

 

Brooksvale Farm Preserve

(McKee/Lewis/Thayer)

20.60

Oldest Connecticut farm property continously owned by a founding Cheshire Family.

This scenic property is permanently protected from development other than agricultural or passive use of the land.

So. Brooksvale Rd. 

 

No

Dec-92

 

Betty LewisJean McKee & Gordon Thayer

E

Brooksvale Farm Preserve

12.45

 

So. Brooksvale Rd. &

No

Dec-95

Betty Lewis

 

(McKee/Lewis)

11.92

 

Canal Line Linear Park

Dec-99

Jean McKee

F

McKee/Lewis

2.86

Acreage on south side of S. Brooksvale Rd. includes protections on brownstone bridge on Mt Sanford Rd.

Mountain Brook Acreage

No

Dec-02

Jean McKee & Betty Lewis

G

Robert & Anne Giddings

16.00

Working Farm property - Boulder Road - adjacent to town owned Boulder Knoll Farm east side greenbelt

Giddings Farm

No

Dec-03

Anne & Robert Giddings

H
Eric Anderson & Brenda Anderson-Killer
4.73
Acreage on historic property along West Main St. Intent: To prevent future residential development of property

West Main St

No
Dec-2009

Eric Anderson & Brenda Anderson-Killer

I
Leavenworth Tree Farm
38
Active family farm enterprise dedicated to Christmas Tree production: Donor intent: Honor the wishes of their parents, John & Charlotte Leavenworth, to preserve the farm and ensure future farming operations.
249 Coleman Road
None unless authorized by family for Christmas Tree cut your own
March 2013
The Knickerbocker, Leavenworth & Palmer Family
 
115.96
Acreage by Easement  

ID Ref.

CLT Property by Title

Acreage

Donor's Intent / Property Profile

Location

Public Access

Acquisition

Donor
1
Russell Family
40.00
Nature Preserve for scientific, educational and esthetic purposes. Adjoins Naugatuck State Forest.

Bethany Mountain Rd.

Yes
Dec-70

Helen F. Russell

2
Strathmore
6.80
Wildlife & bird sanctuary in densely wooded low wetland. 

Oak Avenue

No
Aug-71

Richard Fiske, Ravenswood Properties

3
Country Squire
1.00
Nature preserve

Riverside Dr.

No
Sep-71

Welch Bros. Bldg. Corp.

4
Tow Path Acres
1.60
Forested open space abutting subdivision

Tow Path Lane

Yes
Aug-72

Edward Biafore

5
Bert Cran Memorial
6.80
Forested open space.  Memorial site with massive White Oak and picnic area with direct access to Canal Line Linear Park.

Tow Path Lane & Linear Park

Yes
Aug-72

Irwin R. Sitch

6
Woodhaven
5.70
Open space

Payne Dr.

Yes
Nov-72

Abram Brodach, JB Contractors

7
Willow Brook
8.50
Open space wetland

West Main St.

Yes
Jun-73

Walter Jarvis

8
Seeley Acres
3.00
Open space

Cheshire St.

Yes
Nov-76

Frank Nastri, Seeley House Asso.

9
Brooksvale Preserve
7.60
Wooded wetland abutting Canal Line Linear Park

So. Brooksvale Rd. &

Yes
Jun-76

Socrates H. Mihalakos

10
Carmichael Sanctuary -Nettleton's Ravine Photo #1 # 2 # 3
14.50
Wildlife sanctuary in forested ravine.  Adjoins State forest and town open space.  Access by permission only. Cabin restored 8/02

Bethany Mountain Rd,

Yes
Dec-79

Linda N. Carmichael

11
Thomas Pool Memorial
24.00
Rugged forested slope

Tress Rd.

Yes
Aug-81

Percy H. Goodsell

12
Doede Estate
3.40
Forested open space and wetland

No. Brooksvale Rd.

Yes
Aug-81

Clinton M. & Dorothy R. Doede

13
Briar Court
8.80
Open space wetland

Ives Row

Yes
Nov-82

George W. Richard

14
Fresh Meadows
32.80
Wildlife sanctuary in meadow and forested setting.  Managed system of trails throughout for recreation and observation.

Cook Hill Rd.

Yes
Jun-85

Cheshire Neighborhood Association 

15
Sylvan Lane
5.50
Forested open space and wetland

Oak Ave.  & Sylvan La.

Yes
May-86

Richard Ziegler

16
Ten Mile River Preserve
11.90
Forested open space and wetland

Cheshire Industrial Park

Yes
Dec-87

FIP Corporation

17
Judd Brook Preserve
13.40
Forested open space and wetland

Cheshire Industrial Park

Yes
Aug-89

FIP Corporation

18
Sharon Drive
8.90
Wildlife sanctuary in pristine wetland

Sharon Dr. off Higgins Rd.

Yes
Feb-90

Richard Fiske, Ravenswood Properties

19
George & Frances Salvatore Memorial
3.18
This wetland preserve contains small stonewall dam that is visable from sidewalk along Oak Ave.

Oak Avenue

No
May-91

Frances Salvatore

20
West Cheshire Highlands
16.20
Three wooded sanctuaries in Guinevere Ridge subdivision off Jarvis St.

Guinevere Ridge

Yes
Jun-91

Pennamco, Inc.

21

Old Farms Preserve - Gateway to DeDominicis Preserve PRINT MAP

Photo #1 Photo #2 Photo #3

6.30
Wildlife & Bird Sanctuary.  Open space meadow on traprock uplift.Adjacent to town owned 185 acre DeDominicis preserve

Old Farms Rd.

Yes
Dec-98

Barbara Consolo, James Krieg & Robert Roth

22
Seymour & Emma Pelz Farm Preserve
13.10
Actively farmed for growing corn, acreage is leased by Carmody Bros. Fields slop abruptly at Quinnipiac River.  
No
Aug-01

Emma Pelz

23
Brooke Preserve
40.06
Forested open space. The property will be developed with trails for public access. The mixed hardwood forest has been activelymanaged by the Carpenter / Blackburn family over their 80 year stewardship. Elizabeth Carpenter willed 34 acres and her children sold an additional 6 acres to the Trust in a bargain sale June 2005.Easement granted to SCRWA for $150,000

Sperry Rd.

 
 
Yes
May-05

Elizabeth Brooke Carpenter

The Preserve is named for her father. He purchased this land in 1920.

Dec-05
24
Carroll Woods
4.50
Wooded acreage bisected by Mountain Brook. Site abuts McKee/Lewis

So. Brooksvale Rd. 

No
Dec-05

Don Drago

25
Ives Farm PRINT MAP
164.00
Working Farm - corn, hay, strawberries, greenhouse flowers, vegetables

1585 Cheshire St.

No
Aug-06

Elizabeth Ives

               
Easement Acreage
115.96
6 private properties with enforceable conservation protections
 
   
Acreage by Title
451.54
25 properties
   
Grand Total Acreage
567.50
31 properties
   
------ Value of Protected Land* $8,188,000

*The value of protected land is based on fair market valuations at the time the gifts were made.

The Ives Farm fair market appraisal is $5,400,000. The value of the all other land is $2,788,000 - Value per acre is $9,680.

For accounting purposes the value of the easement properties has no fair market value for the Trust.

 
 

Eric Anderson Anderson Easement...West Main St. Woodland Protected with Conservation Easement - December 30, 2009

Eric Anderson with CLT's Jeanne Chesanow & Kevin Wetmore

The Cheshire Land Trust  announces the completion of the Anderson conservation easement, a donation to the Trust from Eric Anderson and his mother Brenda Anderson-Killer. Under the terms of the easement, a permanent deed restriction, the donors and the Land Trust agreed that this 4.73-acre woodland, just off West Main Street,  will remain undeveloped.  Surrounded by residential neighborhoods, this acreage will not be built upon because of the donors’ wish to keep the land open for future generations. The Land Trust has accepted the responsibility for monitoring the parcel, making once-a-year visits to inspect the property and make sure that all the conservation values are being preserved. The Conservation Values cited in the easement include: provision of food and shelter for birds and animals, prevention of erosion, protection of air quality quality, and protection of water quality in this watershed. The landowner may enjoy passive recreation – walking, bird watching, and berry-picking on this property as he and his family have for many years. His house is on land adjacent to the eased property.  Anderson may build walking trails if he wishes to, but no public access is planned.   A management plan for this property will be prepared in the spring, with copies given to the owner and to the Land Trust. This plan will list activities which will improve habitat and allow some commercial activity while doing no harm. The activities will be those the landowner wants to pursue such as planting  trees, building brush piles for wildlife, culling some trees for firewood, rebuilding stone walls,  putting up birdhouses, and removing invasive plants.

This acquisition is the eighth Conservation Easement accepted by the Land Trust. This acreage includes land owned outright by the Trust along with lands owned by others but under a  conservation easement. “The tax benefits of donating a conservation easement are substantial”, said Kevin Wetmore, President of the Land Trust. “A landowner is entitled to a tax benefit of 50% of his gross income. This amount can be spread out over ten years.”  Wetmore explained that the amount of the  charitable donation is calculated by appraising the highest value of the land, generally that of development, versus the value of the land with the development rights removed. The difference between the two is the amount on which the tax benefit is calculated. What does the Land Trust get out of conservation easements?  They get more land to take care of – and are glad to do it!  More open space means a better looking town, better air and water quality, and an action which follows the Town’s Plan of Conservation and Development which advocates conservation easements and the saving of land – farming lands, pasture lands, orchards, meadows, and wooded properties.   Mr. Anderson and his mother Brenda Anderson-Killer, were the joint donors of the easement, preserving the natural resources, while giving up the right to build on the land.  The town reaps the benefit of their decision:  open space needs no public services, does not require schools or trash removal.

  Webmaster: Tim Slocum            
  Last updated: June 26, 2013